Posts Tagged ‘ Elvin Jones ’

Coltrane at 90

If you live to be old enough, it will happen to you. One day, you will find out that someone you spend nearly every day with turns out to have a 90th anniversary, and you are not ready to celebrate it. That happened today: John Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967) turned 90 before I was ready. I can only promise that 10 years from now I’ll have a proper tribute for the big one. Until then, let me curate a sample without commentary:

With Dizzy Gillespie:

“A Night in Tunesia”

Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet) John Coltrane (tenor sax) Milt Jackson (vibes) Billy Taylor (piano) Percy Heath (bass) Art Blakey (drums)

With Miles Davis:

“It Could Happen to You”

Miles Davis (trumpet) John Coltrane (tenor sax) Red Garland (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Philly Joe Jones (drums); May 11, 1956:

With Thelonious Monk:

“Well, You Needn’t”

Ray Copeland (trumpet) Gigi Gryce (alto sax) John Coltrane, Coleman Hawkins (tenor sax) Thelonious Monk (piano) Wilbur Ware (bass) Art Blakey (drums); June 26, 1957

With Lee Morgan:

“Blue Train”

Lee Morgan (trumpet) Curtis Fuller (trombone) John Coltrane (tenor sax) Kenny Drew (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Philly Joe Jones (drums); September 15, 1957

With Tommy Flanagan:

“Giant Steps”

John Coltrane (tenor sax) Tommy Flanagan (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Art Taylor (drums); May 5, 1959

With Miles Davis:

“Round Midnight”

Miles Davis (trumpet) John Coltrane (tenor sax) Wynton Kelly (piano) Paul Chambers (bass) Jimmy Cobb (drums); April 8, 1960

With Don Cherry:

“Bemsha Swing”

Don Cherry (cornet) John Coltrane (soprano, tenor sax) Percy Heath (bass) Ed Blackwell (drums); July 8, 1960

With the original quartet:

“Central Park West”

John Coltrane (soprano, tenor sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Steve Davis (bass) Elvin Jones (drums); October 24, 1960

“Every Time We Say Goodbye”

(same personnel); October 26, 1960

With Eric Dolphy:

“India”

Eric Dolphy (bass clarinet) John Coltrane (soprano sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Jimmy Garrison, Reggie Workman (bass) Elvin Jones (drums) Ahmed Abdul-Malik (oud)

“Chasin’ Another Trane”

Eric Dolphy (alto sax) John Coltrane (tenor sax) Reggie Workman (bass) Roy Haynes (drums) on the first two choruses only: McCoy Tyner (piano)’: November 2, 1961

“I Want to Talk About You”

John Coltrane (soprano, tenor sax) Eric Dolphy (alto sax, bass clarinet, flute) McCoy Tyner (piano) Reggie Workman (bass) Elvin Jones (drums); November 18, 1961

With the “classic” quartet:

“Soul Eyes”

John Coltrane (soprano sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Jimmy Garrison (bass) Elvin Jones (drums); April 11, 1962

With Duke Ellington:

“In a Sentimental Mood”:

John Coltrane (tenor, soprano sax) Duke Ellington (piano) Jimmy Garrison (bass) Sam Woodyard (drums); September 26, 1962

With the “new” quartet:

:”After the Rain”

John Coltrane (soprano, tenor sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Jimmy Garrison (bass) Roy Haynes (drums); April 29, 1963

With Johnny Hartman:

“My One and Only Love”

John Coltrane (tenor sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Jimmy Garrison (bass) Elvin Jones (drums) Johnny Hartman (vocals); March 7, 1963

A Love Supreme:

“Psalm”

John Coltrane (tenor sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Jimmy Garrison (bass) Elvin Jones (drums); December 9, 1964

With Pharoah Sanders:

“Evolution”

Donald Garrett (bass clarinet, bass) Pharoah Sanders (tenor sax) John Coltrane (tenor, soprano sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Jimmy Garrison (bass) Elvin Jones (drums); September 30, 1965

“Kulu Se Mama”

John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders (tenor sax) McCoy Tyner (piano) Jimmy Garrison (bass) Donald Garrett (bass, bass clarinet) Frank Butler, Elvin Jones (drums) Juno Lewis (vocals, percussion); October 14, 1065

If you would like to celebrate this birthday all day, listen to WKCR’s birthday celebration on iTunes.

September 15, 1963: 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama

A mere fifty years ago today America awoke to the deep and virulent hatred that smoldered in the breast of this country. It was born in an inhumanity that was present long before the founding at the country, acknowledged in the Constitution (an imperfect temporizing which is overly revered today), nurtured with legal, economic and social injustice that still is not eradicated, despite the act of reactionary terrorism that took place on that day.

The victims were as unlikely as the place the massacre took place—at a church on a Sunday morning. None of the victims would be 65 yet, if they had survived. Twenty two others were injured (one girl lost an eye), as the dynamite was timed to go off at the moment that 26 children assembled to hear a sermon on Christian forgiveness. The martyrs were:

Addie Mae Collins (age 14), Denise McNair (age 11), Carole Robertson (age 14), and Cynthia Wesley (age 14).

Addie Mae Collins (age 14) [top left], Denise McNair (age 11) [top right], Cynthia Wesley (age 11) [bottom left] and Carole Robertson (age 14) [bottom right].

Words could not then formulate a civilized response to the craven act of barbarism.

John Coltrane’s elegy on the event, “Alabama,” gives one response:

All history is filled with overwhelming grief, and even the smallest steps forward must be paid for in buckets of innocent blood. And yet that is not enough.  Necessity then requires the innocents to bear their sorrow publicly to let the world judge whether reason exists to deny justice.

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin C. Robertson arrive for funeral services for their daughter Carol, Sept. 17, 1963. [Photo: Bettmann/Corbis.]

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin C. Robertson arrive for funeral services for their daughter Carol, Sept. 17, 1963. [Photo: Bettmann/Corbis.]

At the funeral Martin Luther King said that life was as hard as crucible steel. And though all the mourners over the world played their meek part, justice was still denied. Neither the state nor the federal government filed charges in the 1960s. It wasn’t until 1977 that the first conspirator was charged. He was sentenced to life in prison, but death shortened his sentence eight years later. Another died in 1994, never charged. A third was charged in 2001 and sentenced to life in prison. The fourth was sentenced in 2002 and died two years later. In all, the four assassins enjoyed a total of 122 years before they were charged or 72 years more than the total length their victims lived on earth.

Once it was said that these victims could count the passing of the Voting Rights Act as a memorial. But this year, despite the repeated reenactment by Congress, the Supreme Court, now filled with soulless reactionaries, struck down a key portion of the act as being outdated and not supported by the fact-finding of Congress. Justice Antonin Scalia was secure enough in his own arrogance to say that the Act, which was simply a modest and long-belated form of political justice, “embedded” a form of “racial preferment.” He said this not in a court of law, because to him laws are simply the expression of power which emanates from money, but at a private gathering at the University of California Washington Center.

Within minutes of the Court’s decision, several formerly confederates states began to draw up legislation (and in one case voted on a bill) that would restrict voting access by African-Americans, as well as other groups disfavored by the powers that be. It is therefore clear that although the victims of 50 years ago did not die in vain, America’s original sin has never been expiated. In fact, all signs suggest that buckets of blood will again be required before the rising tide of injustice and malice can be stemmed.